Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Remarkable records of Microlepidoptera in Sweden during 2010.

Abstract

The series of annual compilations of remarkable records of Microlepidoptera is continued for the 38th year. The winter was unusually long but without severe cold. In Skåne the spring arrived at the end of March but further north the snow remained much longer. In spite of rather low numbers of butterflies and moths in general terms five new species for Sweden can be reported, some of them quite extraordinary. Thus at present 1721 species of Microlepidoptera are known from Sweden. The most remarkable record is undoubtedly one single female in the province of Småland of Nemapogon gliriella (Heyden, 1865). Two specimens of the expansive species Ecpyrrhorrhoea rubiginalis (Hübner, 1796) in southern Skåne may be considered migrants. The long distance migration of Psorosa nucleolella (Möschler, 1866) to Öland may be regarded a surprise even if this species was previously known from Finland. Like often before, the part of southern Sweden closest to Finland offered some new species for our country. The discovery of Phyllonorycter populifoliella (Treitschke, 1833), previously known from both Finland and Norway, was since long expected. Denisia luticiliella (Erschoff, 1877), recorded from northern Uppland, was likewise anticipated as it has recently increased its distribution into Estonia and Latvia. The introduced southeast Asiatic and Australian species Arthroschista hilaralis (Walker, 1859) was found indoors after a vacation trip to Thailand and Laos. Selagia argyrella (Denis & Schiffermüller, 1775) has only been known from a doubtful Swedish record. However, this year two specimens were found in the southernmost part of Skåne. Two species resident in Sweden have been confused with species from Central Europe and described as new species during the past year: Coleophora parthenogenella Falck, 2010 has been found to be a sibling species of C. saturatella Stainton, 1859, and under similar circumstances the gracillarid moth Caloptilia jurateae Bengtsson, 2010 has replaced C. semifascia Haworth, 1828. A second finding site for Celypha aurofasciana (Haworth, 1811) was astoundingly discovered in a small beech wood in Småland. Finally, after more than 50 years absence Phyllocnistis saligna (Zeller, 1839) was rediscovered in Skåne, Lund.