Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Bean yellow disorder virus: parameters of transmission by Bemisia tabaci and host plant range.

Abstract

Bean yellow disorder virus (BnYDV) was recently identified as the first crinivirus (family Closteroviridae) that infects members of the family Leguminosae. It was first observed during the autumn of 2003, causing heavy losses in French bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) grown commercially in Spain. The virus is transmitted by the sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) Q-biotype, and disease symptoms resemble nutritional disorders consisting of interveinal mottling and yellowing in leaves, combined with stiffness or brittleness, and are typically produced on the middle to lower parts of the plant. Transmission experiments showed that 50% and 100% of B. tabaci adults acquired the virus after a feeding period of 3 and 7 h, respectively. Viruliferous whiteflies infected 66% and 100% of P. vulgaris plants after a feeding period of 12 and 24 h, respectively. The transmission efficiency of single whiteflies was 37% and persistence of BnYDV in the vector lasted up to 2 weeks with a half-life of 9 days. BnYDV was transmitted to P. vulgaris, Pisum sativum L., Lens culinaris Medik., and Vicia faba L., but not to Vigna unguiculata L., Glycine max (L.) Merr., Cicer arietinum L., and to crop species belonging to families of the Solanaceae and Cucurbitaceae. No virus was detected in field samples collected from 30 different species from Boraginaceae, Asteraceae, Geraniaceae, Lamiaceae, Leguminosae, Malvaceae, Scrophulariaceae, Thymelaeaceae and Verbenaceae. The restricted host range and efficient management of crops regarding whitefly infestation may be key elements in the control of BnYDV.