Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

The allelopathic effect of Taraxacum officinale F.G. Wigg on the seeds germination and initial growth of Lolium westerwoldicum R.Br.

Abstract

The common dandelion (Taraxacum officinale F.H. Wigg) is a perennial plant often found in large concentrations in the sward of natural meadows. This species expands quickly, displacing other species. In literature there is a lack of data relating to the effect of common dandelion on plants growing in its vicinity. It is also not known why this species creates large clusters. Perhaps it competes with different plants through the allelopathic effect. Hence, the aim of this study was to determine the influence of water extracts from leaves and roots of common dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) as well as soil extracts from the root layer of this species on seed germination and the initial growth of Lolium westerwoldicum R.Br. The investigated material comprised leaves and roots of Taraxacum officinale. The germination biotest most often used in experiments was applied. The seeds germination energy of westerwolds ryegrass was most inhibited by plant extracts prepared from roots and leaves of Taraxacum officinale. The germination ability of seeds of Lolium westerwoldicum was the highest in the treatments in which soil extracts were applied; however, the value of this feature was limited to a larger extent by the plant extracts from leaves of Taraxacum officinale than from roots. Higher concentrations of both soil and plant solutions had an inhibitory effect both on root growth and the growth of the leaf sheath and leaves of westerwolds ryegrass. The results of the tested parameters can confirm the allelopathic effect of Taraxacum officinale on germination and initial growth of Lolium westerwoldicum, and especially that of extracts prepared from leaves.