Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Seroprevalence of Lawsonia intracellularis in different swine populations in 3 provinces in Canada.

Abstract

Porcine proliferative enteropathy caused by Lawsonia intracellularis is an important enteric disease in swine throughout the world. Information regarding the distribution of this pathogen in Canadian swine herds would be beneficial for the creation of control protocols. Pigs from Ontario, Quebec, and Alberta were tested by using an indirect immunofluorescence assay for antibodies to L. intracellularis. Pig seroprevalence was calculated as the proportion of pigs positive from total pigs tested in the targeted population. Seroprevalence (±standard error [s]) in market hogs in Ontario from farrow-finish (FF) farms and finishing (FIN) farms were significantly different at 77% (s=7%) and 29% (s=15%), respectively. Seroprevalence for sows and gilts in FF and farrowing and nursery (FAR+NUR) farms in Ontario were 90% (s=3%) and 93% (s=6%), respectively. Seroprevalence in breeding females in Quebec from FF and FAR farms was 82% (s=5%) and 87% (s=3%), respectively. Seroprevalence (57%, s=8%) in finishing pigs in Alberta from FF farms was significantly different from that of multisite (MS) farms and FIN farms, 6% (s=6%) and 9% (s=5%), respectively. Lawsonia intracellularis appears to be widespread in Canada and the seroprevalence on FF farms is higher than that on FIN and MS farms, possibly due to the presence of breeding females or management differences.