Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Fruit trees on agricultural fields of indigenous farms of Talamanca, Costa Rica.

Abstract

We characterized the twelve most important fruit tree species for commercialization in the agricultural areas of 54 farms in five indigenous communities of Bribri and Cabecar peoples in Talamanca, Costa Rica. We measured the abundance and location of fruit trees, as well as dasometric information such as total height, diameter, length and canopy width and shape. Through interviews with farmers, we collected information about propagation methods and agronomic management of species, productive status and fruit quality. In addition, a list was created showing the fruit species preferred by farmers, including the quantity and land use selected for the establishment of each species. A total of 627 individuals were recorded in five land uses: cacao plantations, cacao-banana plantations, domestic gardens, domestic gardens-cacao, and pastures. Nephelium lappaceum was the most abundant species, with 213 individuals, followed by Citrus limon, with 88 individuals. Cacao plantations and domestic gardens exhibited the highest fruit tree species abundance and diversity. Most of the inventoried trees had diameters of between 10 and 29.9 cm. The farmers described 88% of the trees as producing high quality fruit. Farmers asked for 2204 trees, of 25 different species for planting on their land, mainly in domestic gardens and cacao and banana plantations.