Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Pest complex and their succession in mustard under terai ecological conditions of West Bengal.

Abstract

An experiment was conducted in Cooch Behar, West Bengal, India, during the rabi seasons of 2002-03 and 2003-04 to study the pest and natural enemy complex of rapeseed-mustard. The mustard crop was invaded by fourteen insect pests. Among them, the aphid Lipaphis erysimi was found the most dominant and categorized as major pest. Six species of ladybird beetle (Coccinella septempunctata, C. transversalis, Menochilus sexmaculatus [Cheilomenes sexmaculata], Micraspis discolor, Coelophora unicolor [Phrynocaria unicolor] and Oenopia luteopustulata), syrphid flies (unidentified) and spiders (unidentified) were recorded as predators of mustard aphid. The incidence of aphid commenced from 4 to 6 weeks after sowing during December-January but attained the peak level coinciding with the reproductive stage of the crop. The flea beetle (Phyllotreta cruciferae) and diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella) were the most abundant during pod developing stage. On the other hand, sawfly (Athalia lugens proxima [Athalia lugens]) activity was mostly found during seedling stage of the crop. The natural enemies of mustard aphid appeared much late. Their population increased gradually with the gradual increase in aphid population. The natural enemies exhibited their dependence on aphid population.