Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Invasive and non-invasive plants differ in response to soil heavy metal lead contamination.

Abstract

A greenhouse experiment was conducted to test whether and how invasive species (Solidago canadensis) and two non-invasive plant species (Festuca arundinacea, Kummerowia striata) differed in response to soil heavy metal lead pollution in a mesocosm system. Metal lead was applied as Pb(AC)2.3H2O in solution at three levels (0, 300 mg kg-1 and 600 mg kg-1 soil) to simulate a control site and two polluted sites where S. canadensis grows. Shoot biomass and N and P uptake of the indigenous species K. striata decreased, but those of the introduced species F. arundinacea and the exotic invasive species S. canadensis increased in Pb polluted soils. Mycorrhizae colonization of the three species and the nodule biomass of K. striata were reduced by elevated soil Pb concentration compared to control. Root Pb concentration in invasive S. canadensis only accounted for 6.42%, 5.93% and 11.21% of those in non-invasive K. striata under corresponding Pb treatments. The results suggested that rapid growth of S. canadensis in Pb polluted soil might be due to its ability to exclude Pb or reduce the uptake of Pb compared to non-invasive species.