Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Nonindigenous woodboring Coleoptera (Cerambycidae, Curculionidae: Scolytinae) new to Oregon and Washington, 1999-2002: consequences of the intracontinental movement of raw wood products and solid wood packing materials.

Abstract

Urban forests, port areas, mills and businesses known to have received or handled imported wood or wood products were surveyed for nonindigenous woodboring insects in Oregon and southernmost western Washington from 1999-2002, predominantly using Lindgren funnel traps, InterceptTM panel traps and/or Scots pine bait logs. Several other woodborer surveys or projects, using various traps and lures, also took place concurrently. Eight species of nonindigenous woodboring beetles new to Oregon, Washington, the western U.S., western North America, or North America are recorded for the first time: Phymatodes testaceus (L.), Tetropium castaneum L., Xylotrechus hircus (Gebler), and X. sagittatus sagittatus (Germar) (Cerambycidae), Monarthrum fasciatum (Say), Xylosandrus crassiusculus (Motschulsky), X. germanus (Blandford), and an undetermined species of Xyleborus (Curculionidae: Scolytinae). Additional records are included for the following nonindigenous woodborers detected in 1997-1998 and reported in an earlier paper: Gnathotrichus materiarius (Fitch), Hylastes opacus Erichson, Xyleborinus alni (Niisima), Xyleborus californicus Wood, X. pfeili (Ratzeburg) (Scolytinae), and Xiphydria prolongata (Geoffroy) (Hymenoptera: Xiphydriidae). Seventy-five percent of the nonindigenous woodborers treated in this and our earlier paper are known from both eastern and western North America. We believe these western records of five eastern indigenous species and eight extracontinental exotic species established in the East are evidence of the intracontinental movement of untreated domestic solid wood packing material and other raw woods as the probable pathways for these species to the West.