Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Studies on the time of emergence, the flight pattern and the time of attraction to synthetic sex pheromones of some sugarcane moth borers.

Abstract

The flight pattern of male moths and their attraction to sex pheromone lures were studied in Chilo infuscatellus and C. sacchariphagus indicus in Tamil Nadu, and in Scirpophaga excerptalis in Bihar on sugarcane were studied. The time of emergence of the male and female moths of Chilo spp. was studied under laboratory conditions. The time of attraction of male moths to pheromone lures was between 03.00 and 06.00 h, 02.00 and 04.00 h, and 19.00 and 23.00 h for C. infuscatellus, C. sacchariphagus indicus and S. excerptalis, respectively. C. infuscatellus emergence occurred from 19.00 to 06.00 h, but peak emergence was observed between 21.00 and 24.00 h for the males, and between 20.00 and 23.00 h and between 03.00 and 06.00 h for the females. Both sexes of C. sacchariphagus indicus emerged between 16.00 and 07.00 h (peak emergence between 03.00 and 04.00 h). For the 3 moth borers, the period of attraction to lures synchronized with the emergence period of the respective females despite the continuous presence of pheromone plume from synthetic lures. The flight pattern of male moths towards the lures appeared to be guided. However, none of the males of the 3 species physically contacted the pheromone septa. Of the moths attracted to the lures, some got entangled in the traps by chance while the rest flew away after a few minutes of hovering. High-density polyethylene film hoods designed with one-way windows to prevent the escape of attracted males had adverse effect on trap efficiency possibly due to the absence of short-range cues in the lure.