Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Bark and wood-boring beetles captured in traps baited with broad-spectrum attractants.

Abstract

Because of their cryptic habits, phytopathogenic endophytes linked to hard parts of trees and xylophagous insects are not easily identified, and they are often introduced into new environments through international trade in wood materials. Their presence goes unnoticed in the initial phases of colonization of the new habitat, until evident damage indicates their acclimatization. To allow early identification of new accidental introductions of potentially harmful exotic bark and wood-boring beetles, and to monitor possible accidental introductions of the phytopathogenic nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, we conducted trials in central Italy of broad spectrum attractant compounds, used to bait a cross-vane trap modified to allow the capture of small to large xylophagous coleopterans. From May to September 2004, in a Pinus pinaster forest in Florence (Tuscany, Italy), we set traps baited with separate dispensers of: α-pinene + ethanol (α+e); α-pinene + ethanol + Ips sexdentatus aggregation pheromone (α+e+i); a blend of attractants for cerambycids of the genera Monochamus and Xylotrechus (M&X). The best capture results for adult Monochamus galloprovincialis, the main vector of B. xylophilus, were obtained with traps baited with (α+e+i). This blend also attracted a large number of indigenous bark and wood-boring beetles common in the study area, as well as individuals of species that were less common or only recently recorded in Italy.