Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Maximum flood depth characterizes above-ground biomass in African seasonally shallowly flooded grasslands.

Abstract

Flood depth has been frequently used to explain the distribution of plant species in seasonally flooded grasslands, but its relation with vegetation production has remained ambiguous. The relationship between flooding and aboveground biomass at the end of the flooding season and during the dry season was studied to assess the impact of reflooding on the Logone floodplain, Cameroon. Aboveground biomass of a combination of all species and of the individual perennial grasses Oryza longistaminata and Echinochloa pyramidalis showed a positive linear relationship with maximum flood depth up to 1 m. The gradient of these relationships became steeper and their fit better during the 2 years following the installation of the flooding, showing the response lag to floodplain rehabilitation. Flood duration only explained the aboveground biomass of the combination of all species and not of the individual species. Aboveground biomass data from other floodplains in the three main African geographic regions showed a similar relationship with maximum flood depth less than 1 m. Dry season regrowth, important because of its high nutrient quality during forage scarcity, was not directly related to maximum flood depth, possibly because of its dependency on the period of burning and soil moisture. Presented data indicate that a rise of water level of 1 cm corresponds to an increase in aboveground biomass of approx 150 kg DM ha-1.