Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Entrance and distribution of the pinewood nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus on the body of its vector Monochamus galloprovincialis (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae).

Abstract

Aspects of the interaction between the pinewood nematode (PWN) B. xylophilus and its vector, the pine sawyer M. galloprovincialis were studied in Portugal, the only region where the 2 species coexist. Between January and July, third stage dispersal juveniles (J3) of the nematode was the most abundant on pine wood and near insect larval galleries and pupal chambers with pupae. On the pupal chambers with callow adults, the dispersal J4 larvae was the predominant life stage. Analysis of M. galloprovincialis immature stages showed that 11% of insect larvae (mean of 2±0.7 nematodes per insect), 17% of pupae (4.4±3.4) and 91% of callow adults (1089±1219) (mean±SD for all) had pinewood nematodes on them. Two and 30 days after emergence, 40 adult M. galloprovincialis of both sexes were analysed for the distribution of the PWN on their bodies, with the vast majority of nematodes detected on the thoracic region, most abundantly on the meta-thorax. The body segments containing less nematodes were the antennas, legs, wings and elytra. The results were compared with other well-studied B. xylophilus-Monochamus associations from North America and East Asia, and the possibility of surging new functional interactions between the PWN and the European Monochamus spp. is briefly discussed.