Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Initial results in the application of entomopathogenic nematodes against the European cherry fruit fly Rhagoletis cerasi L. (Diptera, Tephritidae).

Abstract

Experiments were conducted in Germany in 2002 under laboratory, semi-field and field conditions to evaluate the insecticidal activities of Steinernema bicornutum, S. carpocapsae, S. carpocapsae strain China, S. feltiae and Heterorhabditis bacteriophora against R. cerasi. The nematodes at 50, 100 or 150 nematodes per larva and pupa were released to cell wells (24 cells filled with quartz sand) with R. cerasi. Petri dishes (filled with quartz sand or soil) with 5 R. cerasi larvae and 50 nematodes/cm2 were also used. For the semi-field experiments, 10 R. cerasi larvae and 50 nematodes/cm2 were used in plastic fruit boxes filled with soil. In field tests, 5×30 R. cerasi larvae per nematode species (S. carpocapsae, S. feltiae and H. bacteriophora) were released to areas in a sweet cherry [Prunus avium] with a dimension of 50×50 cm, within a total area of 20 m2. The nematodes were applied to the soil with water, giving an average dosage of 50 nematodes/cm2. The cell well tests recorded an average infestation rate of 80%, with the highest rates obtained with S. carpocapsae, S. carpocapsae strain China, and S. feltiae. There were no significant differences between the various rates. The average infestation of R. cerasi pupae was very low (2%). When the nematodes were released to petri dishes, the average infestation rates were 71% in quartz sand and 56% in soil. S. carpocapsae and S. feltiae resulted in the highest infestation values. In the semi-field experiment, the average infestation of the R. cerasi larvae was 54%.