Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Micromycetes, producers of toxins, detected on stored vegetables.

Abstract

In 2003-2004, investigations of mycological contamination of stored and newly harvested vegetables were carried out in Lithuania. The aim of the study was to detect fungal species able to synthesize toxic metabolites, which are spread on vegetables under various conditions. For mycological investigations, samples of carrots, onions and cabbage were taken from storehouses with different storage periods and conditions. Penicillium expansum, P. nalgiovense, Mucor silvaticus and P. verrucosum were more frequently detected on carrots, P. expansum on onions, and Aspergillus niger, Botrytis cinerea, Mucor hiemalis, P. funiculosum and P. expansum on cabbages. The storage conditions of vegetables influenced the distribution of different fungal species. Primary screening using CYA and YES test media showed that 46.7% of tested strains may be evaluated as mycotoxin-producers. The ability of fungi to produce mycotoxins depends on their growth substrata. Mycotoxins such as patulin, cytochalasin and penitrem were identified. The ability of P. expansum Sv-168-1 growing on different foods, especially potato, to produce patulin was confirmed quantitatively.