Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Effects of application rate, timing, and formulation of glyphosate and triclopyr on control of Chinese privet (Ligustrum sinense).

Abstract

Chinese privet (Ligustrum sinense) is a nonnative shrub that has invaded mesic forests throughout the southeastern United States during the past century. Foliar sprays of glyphosate and triclopyr were tested in experiments that included wide ranges of application rate, timing, and formulation to refine methods for controlling Chinese privet. For spring (April) and autumn (October and December) applications, the percentage control of privet cover averaged 93-100% and 49-70% for glyphosate and triclopyr treatments, respectively, whereas for summer (June and August) applications, the control averaged 67-69% and 14-26%, respectively (study 1). However, privet control was not influenced by variation in herbicide rates of 1.7, 3.4, 5.0, or 6.7 kg a.e./ha compared with each of the five application timings. No differences were found in August comparisons of liquid vs. dry glyphosate products or water-soluble vs. oil-soluble triclopyr products for each of the four rates (study 2). In a comparison of low rates of glyphosate applied in August with or without trenching of plot perimeters to isolate privet clumps (study 3), control increased from 12 to 65% as rate increased from 0 to 0.8 kg a.e./ha, suggesting that rate responses may occur at lower values than those tested in studies 1 and 2. Isolation of privet clumps by trenching did not have a statistically detectable effect on privet susceptibility to glyphosate. Low rates of glyphosate (1.7 kg a.e./ha or possibly lower) will provide effective control of privet when applied in the spring or autumn.