Invasive Species Compendium

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Abstract

Sensitivity of adzuki bean (Vigna angularis) to preplant-incorporated herbicides.

Abstract

Six field trials were conducted in Ontario, Canada, during 2003 and 2004 to evaluate tolerance in adzuki bean of the preplant incorporation (PPI) of EPTC (4400 and 8800 g a.i./ha), trifluralin (1155 and 2310 g a.i./ha), dimethenamid (1250 and 2500 g a.i./ha), S-metolachlor [metolachlor] (1600 and 3200 g a.i./ha) and imazethapyr (75 and 150 g a.i./ha). All treatments, including the nontreated control, were maintained weed-free during the growing season. EPTC and dimethenamid caused as much as 39% visual crop injury, reducing plant height, shoot dry weight and yield by up to 34, 63 and 38%, respectively. Maturation was delayed with the application of EPTC and dimethenamid. Trifluralin caused as much as 9% visual crop injury and decreased plant height by up to 11%. Trifluralin had no effect on shoot dry weight, seed moisture content and yield. S-metolachlor caused as much as 19% visual crop injury, decreasing plant height by up to 23% and shoot dry weight by up to 29%. Yield was not affected at the low herbicide rate but was decreased by 19% at the higher herbicide rate. S-Metolachlor had no effect on maturity. Imazethapyr caused up to 6% visual injury but had no adverse effects on plant height, shoot dry weight, seed moisture content and yield except at the high rate, which caused a 15% reduction in plant height. Based on these results, trifluralin and imazethapyr applied PPI have an adequate margin of crop safety for weed management in adzuki bean production in Ontario.