Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Pseudomonas solanacearum. [Descriptions of Fungi and Bacteria].

Abstract

A description is provided for Pseudomonas solanacearum[Ralstonia solanacearum]. Information is included on the disease caused by the organism, its transmission, geographical distribution, and hosts. HOSTS: On numerous hosts including tobacco, potato, tomato and eggplant among the Solanaceae; various members of the Musaceae, Compositae, Leguminosae etc. For complete list see Kelman (32: 671) pp. 48-64. DISEASE: A vascular wilt disease with or without browning of the vascular bundles of stems (variation according to strain). Disease variously known as Granville wilt (of tobacco), wilt disease, slime disease, bacterial ring disease (of potato), brown rot of Solanaceae and Moko disease of banana etc., according to host and territory. When diseased potato tubers are cut open and gently squeezed, cream-like drops of sticky liquid containing bacteria are exuded from the severed vascular bundles. The disease may be distinguished from ring rot of potato tubers caused by Corynebacterium sepedonicum (CMI Descript. 14), by the more variable nature of the ring of infected vascular bundles and surrounding tissue which may not always be accompanied by brown discoloration, and the bacterial ooze which may be putty-like rather than viscous or slimy. Methods for differentiating the two diseases are given in 41: 57. GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION: Widespread in topical, sub-tropical and warm-temperate parts of Asia, Africa, Australasia, Europe, N. America, C. America and West Indies (CMI Map 138 Ed. 2). TRANSMISSION: In potato tubers (41: 57), in the transplanting of infected seedlings of tobacco, tomato, pepper and eggplant etc. By movement of contaminated soil in cultural practices, or in irrigation water. On banana by contaminated pruning knives (37: 493), by insects (Nature 194: 164-165, 1962), and by movement of infected rhizomes (40: 551). There is some indication that the pathogen is seed borne on groundnut (1: 328).