Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Overview of natural enemies of sugarcane moth stem borers at Ramu Sugar estate, Papua New Guinea, from 1991-2004.

Abstract

Larvae of moth stem borers of sugarcane are major constraints to sugar production at Ramu Sugar estate, Papua New Guinea (PNG). All the moth borers are indigenous. The most important pest species are Sesamia grisescens, Chilo terrenellus and Scirpophaga excerptalis. The braconid wasp, Cotesia flavipes, is a very important parasite that provides up to 80% parasitism of Sesamia grisescens larvae in the field. The ichneumonid wasp, Enicospilus terebrus, could provide up to 19% parasitism of Sesamia grisescens larvae. Parasitism of Chilo terrenellus larvae by both of these parasites in the field was low (0-20%). Another braconid wasp, Stenobracon sp., is a very important parasite of Scirpophaga excerptalis larvae in Saccharum spontaneum (wild cane), but this parasite is rarely found in commercial crops. The introduced eulophid wasp, Pediobius furvus, has established in PNG and is responsible for up to 50% parasitism of Sesamia grisescens pupae in the field. There was no parasitism observed in Chilo terrenellus.