Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Monitoring insecticide resistance in Australian Frankliniella occidentalis Pergande (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) detects fipronil and spinosad resistance.

Abstract

Insecticide resistance monitoring using a Potter precision spray tower with discriminating concentration and log dose probability techniques underpins the Australian insecticide management strategy for Frankliniella occidentalis Pergande. Abamectin, acephate, chlorpyrifos, dichlorvos, dimethoate, endosulfan, fipronil, malathion, methamidophos methidathion, methiocarb, methomyl, pyrazophos and spinosad are recommended for use against F. occidentalis but abamectin, methiocarb and pyrazophos are the only chemicals where insecticide resistance has not been detected. Although not registered, chlorfenapyr was effective against F. occidentalis and should be pursued for that purpose. In contrast, chlorpyrifos, dichlorvos and malathion resistance were detected at low to moderate levels throughout the study period putting their sustainable use for F. occidentalis control in doubt. Although it appears that acephate, dimethoate, endosulfan, fipronil, methamidophos, methidathion and spinosad remain effective, some populations contained a small percentage of thrips that survived exposure to a concentration that killed 100% of the susceptible strain. Subsequent laboratory selection of one such population separately with fipronil and spinosad caused an increase in resistance to these insecticides. These products must now be considered at risk. This is the first report of fipronil or spinosad resistance in populations of F. occidentalis.