Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Insect and mite activity noted in Ohio nurseries and landscapes: 2003.

Abstract

Gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar) populations were low in the 2003 season across the state of Ohio (USA) as were populations of eastern tent caterpillar (Malacosoma americanum) and fall webworm (Hyphantria cunea). However, localized damaging infestations of yellow-necked caterpillar (Datana ministra) and bagworm (Thyridopteryx ephemeraeformis) were observed throughout the state. Mimosa webworm (Homadaula anisocentra) caused noticeable browning of honeylocusts [Gleditsia triacanthos] in northeastern Ohio. Larch casebearer (Coleophora laricella) was common on its namesake in the southwestern and northeastern areas of the state. A number of sawfly defoliators were observed, including dusky birch sawfly (Croesus latitarsis), hollyhock sawfly (Neoptilia malvacearum), European pine sawfly (Neodiprion sertifer) and white pine sawfly (Neodiprion pinetum). Boxwood leafminer (Monarthropalpus flavus) and oak shothole leafminer (Agromyza viridula) were also common pests. High grasshopper populations were reported throughout the state, which was unusual given the generally wet conditions present for much of the season. The two most common species observed were the redlegged grasshopper (Melanoplus femurrubrum) and the differential grasshopper (Melanoplus differentialis). The non-native emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) was the most significant borer found in Ohio during the 2003 season. However, white pine weevil (Pissodes strobi), Asian ambrosia beetle (Xylosandrus crassiusculus) and the hornbeam version of twolined chestnut borer (Agrilus bilineatus carpini) were also observed. A number of sucking insects appeared in significant numbers in Ohio, including potato leafhopper (Empoasca fabae), yucca plant bug (Halticotoma valida), spiny witchhazel aphid (Hamamelistes spinosus) and pine bark adelgid (Pineus strobi). Several species of lace bugs were also very evident, particularly oak lace bug (Corythucha arcuata), hawthorn lace bug (Corythucha cydoniae) and azalea lace bug (Stephanitis pyrioides). Spruce spider mite populations were low this past season owing to heavy spring rains. However, eriophyid rust mites, including spruce rust mite (Nalepella halourga), hemlock rust mite (Nalepella tsugifoliae), baldcypress rust mite (Epitrimerus taxodii) and the privet rust mite (Aculus ligustri), produced damaging localized infestations in many areas of the state. Japanese beetle (Popillia japonica) populations were generally low throughout the state. However, a heavy emergence of European chafer (Rhizotrogus majalis [Amphimallon majalis]) adults were observed in northeastern Ohio. Bluegrass billbug (Sphenophorus parvulus) and hairy chinch bugs (Blissus leucopterus) were common in a number of areas of the state. The Oriental chestnut gall wasp (Dryocosmus kuriphilus) was found for the first time in Ohio this past season, and Oriental beetle (Anomala orientalis [Blitopertha orientalis]) was found for the first time in central Ohio, far from its previously known sites in the extreme northeastern part of the state.