Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Longevity and fecundity of four species of Anastrepha (Diptera: Tephritidae).

Abstract

This study investigated the longevity of adult A. fraterculus, A. sororcula, A. zenildae and A. obliqua (the first three were collected from guava while the last species was collected from mango). The reproductive pattern was evaluated throughout the life of A. sororcula and A. obliqua, whereas fertility was evaluated within the 18 days of life of the four species. A. zenildae longevity was similar to that of A. sororcula, and longer than that of A. fraterculus and A. obliqua. No statistical difference between the sexes was observed, except for A. obliqua. The decrease in survival occurred fastest in A. obliqua, followed by A. fraterculus and A. sororcula, which was similar to that in A. zenildae. The mean number of eggs at 18 days of life was highest for A. obliqua, followed by A. fraterculus, A. zenildae and A. sororcula. The reproductive pattern over the lifespan differed among the species. A. obliqua presented a longer reproductive period, with more than one oviposition peak, and greater daily and total egg production. The differences observed in the survival patterns, and egg production and oviposition in the Anastrepha species reflect strategies that may be associated with environmental stability and/or differential response capacity to unstable environments. Thus, the existence of similar survival strategies can be suggested between A. obliqua and A. fraterculus, and between A. sororcula and A. zenildae.