Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Phytosociological inventory and assessment of species composition in the field zones in an oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) plantation of West Sumatra.

Abstract

A phytosociological study on the flora associated with oil palm was carried out during 1997-2000 in an oil palm plantation in West Sumatra, Indonesia. A total of 298 plant species were identified: 186 dicotyledons, 77 monocotyledons and 35 ferns, representing 81 families. The families had the highest number of species were Poaceae, Cyperaceae, Asteraceae, Rubiaceae and Euphorbiaceae. To study the plant distribution, 100 relevés (sampling sites) were sampled. Of the 224 species recorded, 8 species occurred with high constancy (in >80% of the relevés), whereas 172 species remained rare (in 20% of the releves). Species composition varied within the area, where soil type was one factor influencing species constancy, abundance and coverage. Species abundance per relevé was significantly higher on Fluvisol than on Histosol, while the difference in the total number of species between the soil type was small. Species found exclusively on Fluvisol were Selaginella plana and Vitis japonica, and on Histosol Momordica charantia and Trema orientalis. The harvesting path, palm circle and interrow represent specific microhabitats hosting alternative species compositions. The species mainly found in the interrow were: Diplazium esculentum, Cyclosorus interruptus, Nephrolepis biserrata and Christella dentata. Primarily found in the other zones were herb species such as Hedyotis corymbosa, Limnophila rugosa, Borreria setidens and Peperomia pellucida, the sedges Fimbristylis miliacea and Cyperus kyllingia [Kyllinga nemoralis] as well as the grass Sporobolus diander. The 8 most frequent species identified as an abstract plant community were: Mikania micrantha, Pouzolzia zeylanica, Ageratum conyzoides, Sporobolus diander, Nephrolepis biserrata, Pityrogramma calomelanos, Lygodium microphyllum and Stenochlaena palustris.