Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Growth and hepatic acetyl coenzyme-A carboxylase activity are affected by dietary protein level in European seabass (Dicentrarchus labrax).

Abstract

Two trials were undertaken with European seabass (Dicentrarchus labrax) to estimate the protein requirements for maintenance and growth as well as the effect of dietary protein level on the activity of hepatic acetyl coenzyme-A carboxylase (ACoAC). Six diets were formulated to contain graded levels of protein (from 5 to 55% crude protein (CP)) at a constant (12%) lipid level. Three other diets were also formulated to contain 35, 45 and 55% CP, but with a higher lipid level (19%). Groups of 10 individually marked fish (IBW: 100 g) and groups of 8 fish (IBW: 160 g) were used in trial I and II, respectively. Fish were fed to visual satiety and intake was recorded. At the end of both studies, whole body, liver and plasma samples were withdrawn for analyses. Growth rate was improved with increasing dietary CP level. Despite not being the object of a statistical analysis, feed efficiency tended to be enhanced at higher dietary CP level and protein efficiency ratio tended to decrease with increased protein intake. The reduction of the dietary protein/energy ratio, due to the increase of dietary lipids further improved growth and feed utilisation. Data from both experiments indicate 4.5±0.5 g kg-1 d-1 as the daily protein intake for maximum N gain and 520±50 mg kg-1 d-1 as the maintenance needs for nitrogen balance. An increase of dietary CP level, up to 25%, increased ACoAC activity. A further increase in dietary CP level (35 to 55%) did not affect liver ACoAC activity. The increase in dietary lipid level depressed significantly liver ACoAC specific activity.