Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Fruit fly research and development in PNG.

Abstract

Many cultivated and natural fruits play an important role both in food security and in meeting nutritional requirements in households throughout Papua New Guinea. Fruit fly species of the family Tephritidae account for significant preharvest and postharvest food losses, and a reduction of these losses will improve food availability at household levels. The Papua New Guinea Fruit Fly Project (PNGFFP) has confirmed over 200 species of fruit fly. Species of economic importance are melon fly (Bactrocera cucurbitae), banana fruit fly (B. musae), mango fly (B. frauenfeldi), Asian pawpaw fruit fly (B. papayae), B. bryoniae, B. moluccensis, B. stringifinis, B. atrisetosa, B. decipiens, B. neohumeralis, B. trivialis and B. umbrosa. The destructive exotic species B. papayae was first sighted in the border provinces in 1992, has spread eastwards, and is established on the mainland, the highlands and in Central Province. The host range, percentage losses and seasonal abundance have been determined for some of these important species. Fruit bagging and protein bait trails have achieved effective control, reducing damage from 98 up to 0%.