Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Effects of mating disruption and conventional pesticide treatments on populations of the tufted apple bud moth, Platynota idaeusalis, in North Carolina apple orchards.

Abstract

Trials were conducted during four consecutive summers (1995-1998) in North Carolina, USA apple orchards to compare the effects of mating disruption and conventional pesticide (chlorpyrifos, methylparathion) treatments on tufted apple bud moth (TABM), P. idaeusalis, populations with regard to number of males caught in pheromone traps, egg masses, leaf shelters, and feeding damage. Pheromone traps caught significantly fewer males in mating disruption than in non-disruption plots. For the first generation, the number of tufted apple bud moth egg masses was higher in the conventional treatment, but in the second-generation, egg mass numbers did not differ among treatments. Neither the number of TABM leaf shelters found per hour, nor the percentage of fruit with TABM feeding damage was significantly different among treatments. However, when TABM populations were high, damage was generally greater in mating disruption plots. Because this insect is usually not of economic concern until populations reach high densities, this insect appears to be less amenable to control with mating disruption compared to other tortricids.