Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Progress toward liquid formulations of particle films for insect and disease control in pear.

Abstract

Particle film technology is aimed at controlling both arthropod pests and diseases of plants with a hydrophobic particle barrier primarily composed of kaolin. Field studies were conducted from 1996 to 1998 in Kearneysville, West Virginia, USA to compare the efficacy of dust and liquid applications, and hydrophobic and hydrophilic particle films, against key pests of pear (cv. Seckel). In addition, the effects of particle film applications on pear yield and quality were investigated in 1998. Dust and liquid applications of hydrophobic and hydrophilic particle films obtained high levels of early-season pear psylla (Cacopsylla pyricola) control and prevented pear rust mite damage (Epitrimerus pyri). We also found that prior seasonal applications of particle films in 1997 can carry over into the 1998 season to suppress early season pear psylla oviposition. A major concern in the shift from hydrophobic to hydrophilic particle films was the loss of disease control. We found that a water-repellant particle film was not required to control the fungal disease fabraea leaf spot (Fabraea maculata [Diplocarpon mespili]). Pear yields were nearly doubled by liquid formulations of hydrophobic and hydrophilic particle films. Particle film deposits were measured using a spectrophotometer method we developed. Particle deposition differed among formulations for both leaf age and leaf surface (top or bottom). Yet, the particle formulations performed about the same against insects and fungal diseases, and in how they influenced the horticultural traits. None of the particle film formulations were found to be phytotoxic to pear foliage or fruit during the study period. A shift from hydrophobic to hydrophilic particles makes it possible to more easily formulate and disperse the particles in water so that conventional spray equipment can be used. The multifunctionality and low toxicity of particle films could make them an attractive alternative to conventional pesticides.