Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

A study of important entomofauna in oak forests of Slovenia.

Abstract

Insects damaging pedunculate oak (Quercus robur) and sessile oak (Q. petraea) forests were studied in 9 areas of Slovenia in spring, summer and autumn 1993 and 1998. A total 35 insect species and two genera were identified from 13 families. The defoliation in the studied forests was between 10 and 90%. More than 80% of the defoliation was caused by mottled umber and winter moths (Erannis defoliaria and Operophtera brumata). Leaf-roll moths are an important group of pests of oak leaves and acorns. The most numerous is the green leaf-roll moth, Tortrix viridana, followed by Archips crataeganus, Laspeyresia splendana [Cydia splendana] and Laspeyresia amplana [Cydia amplana]. The ratio of appearance of oak sawflies (Apethymus abdominalis and Apethymus braccatus) was 9:1. During the past 10 years, oak miner (Tischeria complanella [T. ekebladella]) has attacked young oak trees heavily. Balaninus glandium [Curculio glandium] and Balaninus nucum [Curculio nucum] were important acorn pests. During the population build-up of defoliators in the Prekmurje region of Slovenia there was an increased population density of their predators, such as ground beetles and burying beetles (Calosoma sycophanta, Calosoma inquisitor, Carabus spp., and Xylodrepa quadripunctata [Glischrochilus quadripunctatus]). The study confirmed that the health of oak forests in Slovenia is better than in Croatia and southeastern Europe.