Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Discovery of the small Japanese cedar longhorned beetle, Callidiellum rufipenne (Motschulsky) (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), in live Arborvitae in Connecticut.

Abstract

The small Japanese cedar longhorned beetle, Callidiellum rufipenne (Motschulsky) (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), was discovered principally in three cultivars of American Arborvitae, Thuja occidentalis L., in four towns in Fairfield and New Haven Co. in southwestern Connecticut. Between September 1998 and March 1999, infestations of C. rufipenne were found in 102 (0.5%) of 20,000 cupressaceous plants that were inspected in garden centers, nurseries, landscaped areas, and the wild in Connecticut. Within 2 years of planting, 94 (92.2%) of infested plants had been balled and burlapped, which may have stressed them. Of the 102 plants, 101 (99%) were 0.9-2.1 m high Arborvitae that averaged 6.3 beetles/plant, and the other one was yellow cedar, Chamaecyparis nootkatensis (D. Don) Sprach. Arrivals of beetles in wood material at ports of entry, increased international trade and travel, and the high abundance of potential hosts in coastal North America probably have facilitated introduction and establishment. Adults, life cycle, and damage of C. rufipenne are described briefly.