Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Inventory and fluctuations of the catches of Diptera Tephritidae associated with mangoes in Coastal Guinea.

Abstract

The fruit fly (Diptera, Tephritidae) is a primary pest insect in West Africa where it limits the development of fruit crops. Known facts about the species specific to mango trees in Coastal Guinea and their secondary host plants, as well as their population dynamics, are presented in this document and constitute the first step towards the definition of a control program. The list of the species of Tephritidae specific to mangoes was established after collecting the infested fruit and rearing the pest insects for three consecutive years. The dynamics of their populations was studied after catching the pest insects with traps containing parapheromone and food attractants. The food traps were placed at different heights (2, 4 and 6 m) on three varieties of mango trees: Irwin, Kent and Palmer. Ceratitis rosa and C. cosyra were identified as being the main species of Tephritidae infesting the mango trees. The parapheromone attractants appealed principally to the males of C. rosa, C. anonae and C. capitata, while food attracted both males and females of C. rosa, C. cosyra and C. punctata. The flies of the genus Ceratitis were essentially found on the trees at 4 and up to 6 m above the ground and the best catches occurred before and during the fruit maturation of the late-yielding varieties of mango trees. Additional steps such as annual follow-up catches, the definition of economic thresholds and a thorough inventory of the host plants (wild or cultivated) should be considered as a continuation to this study.