Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

The effect of three species of Eucalyptus on growth and fecundity of the Eucalyptus snout beetle (Gonipterus scutellatus).

Abstract

The Eucalyptus snout beetle, Gonipterus scutellatus, was first detected in NW Spain in 1991, in the area with the largest European eucalypt plantations. Feeding preferences for Eucalyptus spp. in the field were studied at the Center of Forest Research of Lourizán in 1996, and laboratory studies were made of the differential effect of feeding leaves of 3 species of Eucalyptus (E. globulus, E. obliqua, E. cinerea) on larval development, survival, and adult fertility. It was estimated that individuals of G. scutellatus consumed 1.2-1.7 g of fresh biomass in Eucalyptus cinerea and E. globulus during their development. Diet had a significant effect on larval survival and rate of development, the least suitable tree species being E. obliqua. Nevertheless, females fed with these eucalypt species or with an alternated diet containing all 3 eucalypts, did not produce significantly different numbers of larvae. In the field, G. scutellatus showed a marked preference for E. globulus, E. longifolia, E. grandis and E. propinqua, and completely avoided other species.