Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Early performance of ten timber species planted under Acacia mangium plantation on an Imperata cylindrica grassland site in South Kalimantan, Indonesia.

Abstract

The early performance of 9 indigenous and one exotic shade-tolerant timber species planted under an 8-yr-old Acacia mangium plantation on an Imperata cylindrica dominated grassland site was studied for 3 yr in South Kalimantan. The aim was to investigate the differences in early survival and growth between these species. Twenty seedlings of each species were planted in a completely randomized design between the rows of A. mangium; spacings of the newly planted species and the A. mangium were at 4Ă—2 m. Three years after planting, Anisoptera marginata and Eusideroxylon zwageri showed no mortality, Swietenia macrophylla (an exotic species) had a survival of 85%, Dipterocarpus grandiflorus 80% and Shorea balangeran 70%. The other species, all dipterocarps (Hopea sangal, Shorea faguetiana, S. fallax, S. johorensis, S. parvifolia) had a mortality of 35-80% during the third year when serious drought occurred. Swietenia macrophylla had a slow initial height growth but thereafter clearly outperformed other species, reaching a cumulative height increment of 267 cm during 36 months. Height increments of A. marginata, Shorea balangeran and E. zwageri were 121, 97 and 78 cm, respectively over 36 months. Results indicate that potential timber species for planting under fast-growing plantations on grasslands are those having good adaptability to extreme conditions, such as drought. With suitable silvicultural practices, combining local, valuable tree species with fast-growing tree species may be a promising option in developing alternative management strategies suitable for farmer-based land-use systems.