Invasive Species Compendium

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Abstract

Transport and partitioning of assimilates and the structure of source-sink relations in wild plant species of Middle Ural.

Abstract

Post-photosynthetic partitioning of 14C-labelled assimilates during flowering was investigated in eight wild plant species inhabiting the Middle Ural boreal zone (Polygonum aviculare, Taraxacum officinale, Achillea millefolium, Alchemilla vulgaris, Plantago major, Echinochloa crus-galli, Setaria viridis and Amaranthus retroflexus). The species examined differed in their patterns of source-sink relations. The rate and pathways of assimilate partitioning were found to relate to biomass structure (i.e., weight proportions between source and sink organs). The highest rates of respiration and 14C export from leaves were observed in plants with a higher proportion of reproductive organs (the main above-ground sink for assimilates) in the plant total biomass. It is concluded that post-photosynthetic partitioning of carbon in the plants tested depends on the demand for assimilates from above-ground sinks (reproductive organs). The relationship between the post-photosynthetic partitioning of assimilates, the life form, the type of photosynthetic metabolism, and strategies of adaptive change are discussed.