Invasive Species Compendium

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Abstract

Outbreak of infectious granulomatous vaginitis in cattle caused by Ureaplasma diversum.

Abstract

The first diagnosed outbreak of bovine granulomatous vulvovaginitis in Norway occurred at the Norwegian College of Veterinary Medicine in March, 1995; the source of the infection was not established with certainty, but it was thought that some animals may have had a chronic infection that developed with stress, and that it was spread by palpation. Of 17 animals, 14 had typical oedema of the vulva, and the subepithelial lymph follicles appeared as dark granules in the vulva. The vaginal discharge was clear or milky, and dried into crusts. Ureaplasma was identified in cultures of swab samples from 6 of the 8 animals sampled. Of 9 heifers that were pregnant, one aborted a 7-week-old fetus. No change in bovine diarrhoea virus infection status was found during or after the outbreak. The non-pregnant animals were treated with tetracycline, and those that were pregnant, as well as one each with delayed puberty and ovarian hypoplasia, were given tetracycline and also treated locally with a disinfectant. The subsequent reproductive history of the animals is reported; of the 8 that remained pregnant, all produced normal calves.