Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Fauna and seasonal abundance of Carpophilus spp. (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae) in four stone fruit growing regions of southeastern Australia as determined by pheromone-trapping.

Abstract

Traps baited with synthetic aggregation pheromones of Carpophilus hemipterus, C. mutilatus and C. davidsoni and fermenting bread dough were used to identify the fauna and monitor seasonal abundance of nitidulids in orchards in 4 stone fruit-growing regions of south-eastern Australia (Shepparton, Cobram (Victoria), Renmark (South Australia) and Windsor (New South Wales)). During 1992-94, 7 species (C. davidsoni, C. hemipterus, C. mutilatus, Urophorus humeralis, C. gaveni, C. marginellus and an unidentified species 'Y') were trapped at all sites and an additional unidentified species ('X') was recorded from Windsor. C. davidsoni was the dominant species at all sites, particularly at Shepparton where it accounted for 88-98% of all nitidulids trapped. C. hemipterus was trapped commonly at Cobram and Renmark but was rare at Windsor and Shepparton. C. mutilatus was common at Windsor and Renmark but rare in Shepparton and Cobram. The total number of nitidulids trapped at Shepparton was 10-15 times greater than at the other sites in 1993-94. Seasonal abundance of Carpophilus spp. was similar at all sites with high numbers in spring, followed by a decline and a secondary peak in early summer. At the 3 inland sites (Shepparton, Cobram, Renmark), populations 'crashed' and beetles were virtually absent during January-March. A less dramatic decline also occurred at Windsor.