Invasive Species Compendium

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Abstract

Population studies of Callidiellum rufipenne (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) on Japanese cedar logs.

Abstract

Demographic characteristics of Callidiellum rufipenne populations on Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica) logs, oviposition schedule of adult females, mortality factors within logs, and adult population parameters were investigated in Japan. The average longevity of adults on the rearing experiment was 18.0 days for males and 16.6 days for females. Adult females could lay eggs soon after emergence without maturation feeding, and average fecundity was 18.1. Two principal parasitoids, a braconid and an ichneumonid, were found near dead larvae under the bark. Adults began to fly to the cedar logs around mid-April, 4 days after logs were placed on the forest floor, and disappeared in late May. Daily survival rates were 0.772 for males and 0.863 for females, and mean resident time on logs was 3.9 days for males and 6.8 days for females. There were fewer females than males throughout the season, especially early in the flight period. A comparison of population properties of C. rufipenne and Semanotus japonicus clearly indicated that both were related closely to the specific characteristics of their habitats, i.e. C. rufipenne as a secondary insect uses dead trees, whereas S. japonicus as a primary insect using living trees.