Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Mixed tree plantations: experiments with native trees in Costa Rica and Argentina.

Abstract

A brief report is given of trials in these two countries funded by the A.W. Mellon Foundation (USA). In Costa Rica, at the La Selva Biological Station, 3 trial plantations have been established, each with a combination of 4 different native species selected to take account of tree architecture and habit, nutrient requirements, susceptibility to insect damage and presence of root nodules (in leguminous species). Each plantation contained at least one leguminous nitrogen fixer and another known for good litter production. Initial spacing is at 2×2 m and planting is done in June and November on abandoned pasture land with poor soils; thinning and pruning is to be done later. The 3 species combinations are: (1) Stryphnodendron excelsum, Vochysia hondurensis, Jacaranda copaia and Calophyllum brasiliense; (2) Albizia guachapele, Dipteryx panamensis, Terminalia amazonia and Virola koschny[i]; and (3) Pithecellobium elegans, Hyeronima alchorneoides, Laetia procera and Nectandra membranacea. The plantations in Argentina were established in November 1989 and August 1990 at San Antonio and Eldorado, in collaboration with the Subtropical Forestry Research Institute of the National University of Misiones. Spacing was 3×3 m and the species combinations (selected on similar criteria to those used in Costa Rica) were: at San Antonio, Cordia trichotoma, Ocotea puberula, Peltophorum dubium and Parapiptadenia rigida; and at Eldorado, Bastardiopsis densiflora, Enterolobium contortisiliquum, Lonchocarpus muehlbergianum [L. muehlbergianus] and Balfourodendron riedelianum. The long-term objectives of the trials are silvicultural and soil restoration research.