Invasive Species Compendium

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Abstract

Fumonisin B1 production by strains from different mating populations of Gibberella fujikuroi (Fusarium section Liseola).

Abstract

G. fujikuroi can be subdivided into 6 distinct mating populations that probably represent different biological species. Members of 4 of these mating populations (A, D, E and F) are commonly found in asymptomatic and diseased maize and sorghum plants. A total of 56 G. fujikuroi isolates collected from maize and sorghum fields in Kansas, USA, were assigned to mating populations and tested for their ability to produce the mycotoxin fumonisin B1. When grown on maize grain under lab. conditions, members of the A population could produce an av. of 1786 p.p.m. of the toxin, members of the D population averaged 636 p.p.m., the E population 33 p.p.m. and the F population 7.5 p.p.m. Strain-related variability in fumonisin B1 production was relatively large in the A and D populations (307-4425 and 4-2618 p.p.m., respectively) and relatively low in the E and F populations (6-146 and 2-35 p.p.m., respectively). The level of fumonisin B1 produced by the different isolates did not appear to be related to geographic origin, host or disease status of the host plant. These data are generally consistent with previous work on this mycotoxin, but the differences between the A and F mating populations are significant because both of these groups share the Fusarium moniliforme anamorph.