Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Redroot pigweed (Amaranthus retroflexus) and barnyardgrass (Echinochloa crus-galli) interference in potatoes (Solanum tuberosum).

Abstract

In greenhouse replacement series experiments, potatoes cv. Atlantic and Russet Burbank and barnyardgrass (E. crus-galli) were more competitive than redroot pigweed (A. retroflexus) as measured by relative competitive ability. In additive design field studies, 4 redroot pigweed or barnyardgrass plants/metre of row did not reduce Atlantic tuber yield when planted between the row following hilling (6 to 7 weeks after planting). However, as few as one plant of either weed/metre of row reduced marketable tuber yield 19 to 33% when seeded in the row at the time of potato planting. Redroot pigweed reduced tuber yields more than barnyardgrass did in 1 year of research. The correlation coeff. were similar for both weed density and weed biomass regressed on tuber yield. Aboveground potato biomass was not consistent in predicting total tuber yield. Furthermore, variability in aboveground potato biomass was not due to increasing weed weight or density. Neither specific gravity nor tuber quality was altered by the presence of any density of either weed species.