Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Seasonal history of the peach fruit moth, Carposina sasakii Matsumura, in an isolated garden with plum and Japanese dwarf quince as major hosts.

Abstract

In a small abandoned garden at Morioka, Japan, Carposina sasakii attacked plum fruits during the 1st half of the growing season and also those of the wild Japanese dwarf quince during the 2nd half. Field and laboratory observations suggested that the isolated local population of C. sasakii had a complicated seasonal cycle. Adults of the overwintering generation emerging early provided some of the 1st generation larvae on plum, which then produced a partial 2nd generation on quince. Adults of the overwintering generation emerging late formed the univoltine part of the 1st generation on quince. Overwintering larvae of mixed generations were produced from quince alone. In 1982, adult catches by pheromone traps showed 2 peaks, both attributable to the overwintering generation. In successive years, the earlier peak was gradually suppressed, possibly because of low temperatures.