Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Clearing the scrubs of south-east Queensland.

Abstract

The dependence of the Queensland timber building tradition on the original forests of SE Queensland is discussed. Most softwood used for construction in Queensland before World War I was of species indigenous to the colony - hoop pine (Araucaria cunninghamii), bunya pine (Araucaria bidwillii) and kauri pine (Agathis robusta). These species still occur in SE Queensland but are mostly restricted to national parks and state forests and are far from dominant. Explorers' reports indicate that these 'Araucarian scrubs' were widespread, although their previous size and location is imprecise. Construction of houses in Queensland was largely uncontrolled until the Local Authorities Act of 1902 gave local government the power to regulate building. After World War I, the use of timber in construction began to decrease; after World War II, as imports and costs increased, timber external cladding was replaced by sheet materials or masonry. This resulted in the decline of the Queensland timber building tradition.