Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Bristly starbur (Acanthospermum hispidum) interference in peanuts (Arachis hypogaea).

Abstract

The effects of bristly starbur (A. hispidum) interference with groundnuts were studied from 1980-83 on a Dothan sandy loam (Plinthic Paleudults). Groundnut seed yields, which included seed + hulls, were reduced as bristly starbur densities increased from 2 to 64 plants/7.5 m of row. Full-season interference from 8, 16, 32 and 64 bristly starbur plants/7.5 m of row reduced groundnut seed yields 14, 26, 43 and 50%, resp. The seed yield of groundnuts maintained weed free for 6 weeks after crop emergence was reduced by no more than 3% compared to groundnuts maintained weed free for the entire season. Weed interference for 2 weeks after crop emergence reduced seed yield by an average of 4% over the 3-year period, based on prediction equations. Bristly starbur interference for 13 weeks after crop emergence reduced groundnut forage DW yield by 54%. Similarly, groundnut interference for 13 weeks after emergence reduced bristly starbur forage DW yield by 32%. Bristly starbur density in the forage DW studies averaged 35/7.5 m of row. These bristly starbur were confined to a 35-cm band over the drill. Groundnut density averaged 72/7.5 m of drill.