Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania tropica in Kenya.

Abstract

Two American children aged 9 and 12 years, who had been born and raised in Kenya, developed skin lesions in 1984 which were diagnosed as due to cutaneous leishmaniasis. A 34-year-old American man who worked with the children's father also developed skin lesions in 1986. All 3 patients had been to the same Kenyan locations of Rumuruti, Maralal and Masai Mara; from their histories all 3 patients are thought to have acquired their infections in Kenya. Nine strains of leishmania isolated from cutaneous lesions on the patients had isoenzyme patterns (7 enzymes) consistent with identification as Leishmania tropica; in addition the 9 strains failed to infect BALB/c mice. The authors consider these to be the first reported cases of cutaneous leishmaniasis due to L. tropica in Kenya.newline˜Carolyn A. Brown<new para>ADDITIONAL ABSTRACT:<new para>9 leishmanial strains, isolated from cutaneous papulonodular lesions on 3 patients, were characterized by cellulose acetate electrophoresis using 7 enzymes. The patterns obtained were indistinguishable from those of a L. tropica reference strain and these 9 strains were similar to L. tropica in failing to infect mice. Although these 3 patients were Americans, their only potential exposure to sandflies was in Kenya, and thus they are believed to be the first cases of cutaneous leishmaniasis due to L. tropica in Kenya.