Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Insect inhabitants of fruits of Leptospermum, Eucalyptus and Casuarina in south-eastern Australia.

Abstract

Insects dissected and reared from the fruits of L. myrsinoides, L. juniperinum, L. laevigatum, L. lanigerum, E. baxteri, E. obliqua, E. willisii, C. pusilla, C. stricta, C. littoralis and C. paludosa, collected from 18 sites over 4 growing seasons at Wilsons Promontory, Victoria, are enumerated and discussed. The distribution of phytophagous insects was related to host-plant phylogeny and, in particular, to fruit morphology. Insect species often occurred within a host genus, but were never recorded from different host genera. The major seed-eating insects recorded in each host taxon were: in Eucalyptus (all fruits woody and persistent capsules), Dryophilodes and chalcidoid wasps, mostly Megastigmus and Eurytoma; in Casuarina (all fruits woody and persistent 'cones'), chalcidoid wasps, mostly Bootanelleus, and unidentified cosmopterigid moths; in L. juniperinum and L. lanigerum (woody and persistent capsules), Dryophilodes and unidentified cosmopterigid moths; in L. laevigatum (semi-fleshy and semi-persistent capsules), Dryophilodes and an unidentified cecidomyiid fly; in L. myrsinoides (fleshy and ephemeral capsules), an unidentified weevil and unidentified carposinid moth.<new para>ADDITIONAL ABSTRACT:<new para>Insects dissected and reared from the fruit of 4 species of Leptospermum, 3 of Eucalyptus and 4 of Casuarina collected from 18 sites at Wilsons Promontory, Victoria, Australia, in 1981-84 are listed and discussed. The fruits of all plant species supported abundant and diverse assemblages of seed-eating insects and their associated parasitoids. The distribution of the phytophagous species was related to food-plant phylogeny and fruit morphology.