Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Invading plants at high altitudes on Tenerife especially in the Teide National Park.

Abstract

The roles of 83 flowering plants as successful, failed or potential invaders of the Teide National Park, Tenerife, a caldera at ≥2000 m alt. with a largely endemic native flora are discussed. Two important methods of invasion are considered. Dispersal occurred by pastoralism as goat-herding, an ancient practice which ceased >30 years ago. The development of mass tourism in the last 25 years brought a fresh influx of alien plants. Many of the 83 invaders discussed had only transient occurrences, but 30 were well-established, 15 being grasses among which Bromus tectorum and Vulpia myuros were the most abundant. Chenopodium vulvaria and Poa pratensis are new to Tenerife and Dactylis glomerata subsp. hispanica is new to the Canary Islands. Control measures are outlined. Attempts have already been made to contain Avena barbata, Lactuca serriola and Chenopodium spp. by burning and manual control.