Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

The formation of trunk-insect complexes on irrigated areas in the Kopet-dag foothills.

Abstract

The most important timber-attacking insects in forest stands and fruit crops in irrigated areas of the Kopet-dag foothills in the Turkmen SSR, USSR, comprise 18 species, 7 of which breed in orchards while the remainder attack forest trees. The main factor determining the invasion of orchards by dendrophilous insects is the insect-pest fauna of forest-tree species growing nearby. Polyphagous species, such as the buprestid Chrysobothris affinis, the cerambycid Aeolesthes sarta and Cossus cossus, readily invade orchards, and Scolytus multistriatus, the cerambycids Trichoferus campestris [Hesperophanes campestris] and Xylotrechus namanganensis and the cossid Zeuzera pyrina, typically associated with tracts of woodland, can also develop in orchards. In developing forest stands, account should be taken of the capacity of the tree species to resist insect pests: the most susceptible appear to be Ulmus carpinifolia [U. minor] and species of Salix and Elaeagnus.