Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Fungal rot of potato tubers in controlled atmospheres.

Abstract

Extensive rotting of tubers occurred during storage trials in controlled atmospheres. The most frequently isolated sp. was Fusarium culmorum, although F. avenaceum [Gibberella avenacea], F. sambucinum [G. pulicaris], Colletotrichum coccodes and a Cylindrocarpon sp. were also present.
Tubers of the cultivars Bintje and Ulla were inoculated with 19 isolates of 10 fungi associated with rotting of stored tubers, then incubated at 8 or 10°C in normal or controlled (2% O2:1-12% CO2, 6% O2:6% CO2) atmospheres and the extent of rotting was determined a month later. Spp. which were weakly virulent in a normal atmosphere (various F. spp. and Phoma exigua var. exigua) were clearly more aggressive in the controlled atmosphere and this was especially evident in the case of F. culmorum. Spp. not pathogenic in a normal atmosphere under experimental conditions (Colletotrichum coccodes, Cylindrocarpon sp. and P. eupyrena) caused rotting in the controlled atmosphere. The 2 spp. which were virulent in a normal atmosphere (F. sulphureum and P. exigua var. foveata) were less virulent in the controlled atmosphere and in some cases the extent of rotting was even less extensive. Rotting caused by weakly virulent fungi was generally greater in both cultivars in the controlled than in a normal atmosphere.