Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Root rot of chickpeas and lentils caused by Thielaviopsis basicola.

Abstract

Survey of pulse fields in northern Idaho and eastern Washington in 1984 showed that chickpeas (Cicer arietinum) often bore black root rot symptoms. On lentils symptoms were similar though less severe. T. basicola was isolated from 58 and 13%, respectively, of chickpea and lentil root pieces. Both spp. were susceptible in greenhouse tests, and the pathogen was successfully reisolated. Chickpeas were more susceptible to infection than lentils or peas. No differences in pathogenicity were detected among T. basicola cultures originally isolated from peas and chickpeas. Sources of partial resistance were found in breeding lines of chickpeas and lentils. This is the first report of root rot chickpeas and lentils caused by T. basicola under field conditions.<new para>ADDITIONAL ABSTRACT:<new para>Significant differences in susceptibility to T. basicola were found among 12 chickpea lines. Single degree-of-freedom contrasts showed that epicotyls and roots of white-seeded kabuli-type chickpeas were significantly more susceptible than those of dark-seeded desi types. An exception was IC7519, a small-seeded kabuli, which was as resistant as the desi types. All 12 lentil lines studied had highly resistant epicotyls, but none had highly resistant roots. Among local commercial cultivars, Laird was less susceptible than Brewer or Chilean 78. The apparent increase in weight of infected Indian Head, it is considered, may have been caused by genetic variability in this line.