Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Studies on the biotaxonomy, biology and ecology of some longicorn beetle borers (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) of the Islands of Andaman, India.

Abstract

Aspects of the biotaxonomy, biology and ecology of some 30 species of cerambycid wood-borers in the Andaman Islands, India, are discussed in 11 chapters (of which the main ones deal with physiography, history, biotaxonomic study, biological observations, ecological investigations and economic importance). Information is given on the pattern of galleries, pupal chambers and entrance and exit holes. Most species prefer to oviposit in freshly felled trunks of forest trees, and nearly 80% occur in logs no more than 2 months old; infestation declines rapidly as the logs age. A few species are recorded in fruit trees such as citrus, fig, mango and cashew. Since they seldom kill living trees (attacking mainly unhealthy ones) or totally destroy infested logs, they are regarded as secondary pests. Rhaphipodus andamanicus and R. hopei appear to be the most destructive species in the timber extraction centres and depots, Stromatium barbatum in dry and seasoned wood and Aeolesthes holosericea in standing unhealthy forest trees. Most species are polyphagous, especially S. barbatum. A catalogue of food-plants, with their pests, is appended, and also an index of scientific names of the cerambycids.