Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

The insects of Euroamerican poplars and their original food-plants. Ecological aspects of problems of prevention and control.

Abstract

In this study of plantations of rapidly growing hybrid poplars (a cross between Populus deltoides and P. nigra known as P. canadensis) in Italy and of the insects attacking them, the artificial nature of the habitat is emphasised. The lack of variability caused by the clonal nature of the trees and the absence of underbrush can result in potential pests being better able to adapt to them than to other food-plants. Some pests thrive better and cause more damage on the new hybrids than on the parent species. The rapid growth of the hybrids is their one advantage, enabling them to compensate for defoliation. Leaf-feeding insects include Leucoma salicis (L.), Clostera anastomosis (L.) and various chrysomelids and leaf-miners. Sap-suckers include Phloeomyzus passerinii (Sign.), Lepidosaphes ulmi (L.) (Mytilococcus ulmi) and Chionaspis salicis (L.). Wood-borers include Saperda carcharias (L.), which causes more economic damage than any other pest.