Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Cerambycidae (Coleoptera) imported into Hamburg.

Abstract

The accidental introduction of 37 species of cerambycids (an annotated list of which is given) into Hamburg, German Federal Republic, with forest trees and products is reported. These species are divided into 3 groups, of which the 1st contains exotic species, the 2nd contains species found in Europe but not in the neighbourhood of Hamburg, and the 3rd contains species which are present in forests near Hamburg but of which native populations are sometimes augmented by immigration from elsewhere. Although introduced immature stages often gave rise to adults, there was little risk of most of the species concerned multiplying and spreading in the Hamburg district, since the drying of timber tended to prolong the development of individual beetles to differing degrees and thus reduced the chances of encountering a mate of the same species and suitable age; furthermore, the oviposition and feeding requirements of females and young larvae demanded types of wood differing from those from which the original adults emerged, and exotic species also required a different climate from that of Hamburg. The species most likely to become established and therefore the most dangerous were Chlorophorus annularis (F.) and Nathrius brevipennis (Muls.). In addition to these 37 species, attention is also drawn to Hylotrupes bajulus (L.), which spread by flying from house to house, Gracilia minuta (F.), which breeds in dry branchwood and basketwork made from willow twigs, and Leptura rubra L. infesting damp woodwork in houses near forests, and some doubtful importations are discussed.